A Love Story

In 1975 Marina Abramovic met Ulay, an artist who shared her date of birth as well as her artistic concerns. Over the next two decades they lived and collaborated together, performing and traveling extensively. Their performances explored the parameters of power and dependency within the triangular relationship between each other and their audience.

In one performance, Breathing In/Breathing Out (1977), with their mouths clamped tightly together and microphones taped to their throats, Abramovic and Ulay breathed in turn the air from each other’s lungs, until – almost to the point of suffocation – they were exchanging only carbon dioxide. In another, Rest Energy (1980), they held a taut bow with an arrow loaded and pointing at Abramovic’s heart, with only the weight of their bodies maintaining the tension. Microphones recorded their rapidly accelerating heartbeats.

Text from Lacan

After a 12-year relationship fuelled by passion that could rival the greatest lovers in history, they finally agreed to part ways forever. For their last artistic collaboration they decided to each walk 2,500 miles from either end of The Great Wall of China, and meet in the middle to say their goodbyes. The 2012 documentary, The Artist is Present,  reveals the moment when Ulay and Marina are reunited 20 years later in New York on the days leading up to her retrospective show.

Now living separate lives, the chemistry between them is still palpable. On the opening night of her show, when she begins her three-month stint in the wooden chair, staring people in the eyes, Ulay turns up and sits opposite her, creating a seriously epic, utterly real interaction between two past soulmates, brought together again by the art that joined them when they met.

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I’m Too Sad To Tell You

In the film I’m Too Sad To Tell You (1970), Bas Jan Ader sits on a chair and cries. And cries.

Read more in Frieze


Nude With Skeleton

Nude With Skeleton. Marina Abramovic. 2002-2005/2010.

Nude With Skeleton. Marina Abramovic. 2002/2005/2010.

In her performance piece Nude with Skeleton, Serbian artist Marina Abramović uses a replica skeleton to symbolize confrontation with death. The work refers in part to an ancient Tibetan tradition in which Buddhist monks meditate on life, death and mortality by sleeping with skeletons of various stages of decomposition on consecutive nights. Abramović explains, ‘The work is really about facing your own mortality. It’s something that in our life we fear the most. It is about fear of pain and fear of dying”

text from: http://abramovic.garageccc.com/


Breathing In/Breathing Out

‘We are kneeling face to face, pressing our mouths together. Our noses are blocked with cigarette filters. I am breathing in oxygen. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’

In their performance piece Breathing In/Breathing Out Marina Abramovic and Ulay blocked their noses with cigarette filters and clamped their mouths tightly together, breathing in and out each other’s air.  After seventeen minutes they both fell to the floor unconscious. The viewers could sense the tension through the sound of their breathing, which was augmented through microphones attached to their chests.  Is it a beautiful romantic gesture or a comment on how relationships absorb and destroy an individual?

“Something tender and violent at the same time emerges from the performance: the couple are decided to stick together despite the effort, the danger, the damage; but as is the case with human relations of this kind of intensity, they end up with violence, pain, and a part of each other ‘dead’. It is the idea of interdependency portrayed to its extreme.” Interartive

abramovic breathing in breathing out

Breathing In/Breathing Out. Marina Abramovic and Ulay. 1977.

Breathing In/Breathing Out. Marina Abramovic and Ulay. 1977.

Breathing In/Breathing Out. Marina Abramovic and Ulay. 1977.


Anthropométries

Yves Klein used naked women as ‘human paintbrushes’ to make his Anthropometry paintings, which were produced as elaborate performances in front of an audience. Klein, in bow-tie and suit, would conduct the women as they covered themselves in paint (a colour he patented as ‘International Klein Blue’) and made imprints of their bodies, whilst musicians played his ‘Monotone Symphony’ – a single note played for twenty minutes, followed by twenty minutes of silence.

Yves Klein Anthropometry events were one of the key events in the history of painting and performance A revolutionary moment in art when the artist exposed the making of the painting. They really mark a shift between painting as something that happens on the canvas to artists exposing the making of painting

From Tate Shots

Anthropométries. Yves Klein. 1960.

Anthropométries. Yves Klein. 1960.


The Transient Art of Cai Guo-Qiang

While some works of art have survived thousands of years others are as fleeting as a shooting star. A master of the ephemeral, Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang uses the sky as his canvas and gunpowder as his paintbrush in his staged firework performances which can take place in day or night.

Black Ceremony, Qatar, 2011

Black Ceremony, Qatar, 2011

Black Ceremony, Qatar, 2011

Black Ceremony, Qatar, 2011

Black Ceremony, Qatar, 2011

Black Ceremony, Qatar, 2011

Black Rainbow, Valencia, 2005

Black Rainbow, Valencia, 2005

Fallen Blossoms, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2009.

Fallen Blossoms, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2009.