Objeto Ativo

“I see Castro’s entire body of work as a series of breadcrumbs scattered across a forest floor. For some, hundreds of tiny pieces of old stale bread is hardly worth noticing, while others are able to discover within a trail of detritus a path towards something not yet known. It this within this tension between the known and unknown that de Castro’s works generously offer the alchemical potential to their viewers. Of course, with alchemy everything is already there for the making, but one must have the right point of view…”

From Steve Roden’s essay, The Intimate Boundlessness, in the exhibition catalogue Concrete Invention: Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Objeto Ativo, Willys de Castro, 1961

Objeto Ativo, Willys de Castro, 1961

Objeto Ativo (Cubo Vermelho/Branco), Willys de Castro, 1962

Objeto Ativo (Cubo Vermelho/Branco), Willys de Castro, 1962

Modulated Composition, Willys de Castro, 1954

Modulated Composition, Willys de Castro, 1954

 

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Bathers on the Beach

On a Sunny Day…

Bathers, Pablo Picasso, 1920

Bathers, Pablo Picasso, 1920

On a Rainy Day…

Bologna, Luigi Ghirri, 1973

Bologna, Luigi Ghirri, 1973


The Life of Forms in Art

“Hokusai tried to paint without the use of his hands. It is said that one day, having unrolled his scroll in front of the shogun, he poured over it a pot of blue paint then, dipping the claws of a rooster in a pot of red paint, he made the bird run across the scroll and leave its tracks on it. Everyone present recognized in them the waters of the stream called Tatsouta carrying along maple leaves reddened by autumn.”

Henri Focillon, The Life of Forms in Art (1934)

Spider, Alexander Calder, 1939

Spider, Alexander Calder, 1939


Memory of a Voyage

Memory of a Voyage. Rene Magritte

Memory of a Voyage. Rene Magritte


Picasso/Dalí

As Picasso himself said,Good artists copy, great artists steal. So Dalí began his career by “stealing” from Picasso, stimulating the development of his own unique style. Picasso was 23 years Dalí’s senior and was already an established figure in the art world when Dalí was a young aspiring artist. He was a huge admirer of Picasso and sought inspiration from him.

Dalí’s first associations with Picasso were very literal – he boldly stole from Picasso’s themes and visual language. This can be seen clearly in the two pieces Group of Female Nudes (1921) by Picasso and Bathers of Es Llaner (1923) by Dalí, which are astoundingly close in their style and content. As he progressed, however, Dalí developed his own personal and distinctive expression while still retaining elements of Picasso’s visual language and symbolism, and when Dalí’s career took off, Picasso went from being his greatest source of inspiration to being his biggest rival.

picasso__group_of_female_nudesBathers of Es Llaner dali

The artists first met in 1926 when Dalí visited Picasso’s studio in Paris. At the time, Picasso was reworking a style of cubism infused with surrealist ideas of dreams, sexuality and the irrational. The visit equipped Dalí with a newfound maturity in his artistic language, making him more conscious of composition and symbolism in his work. Subsequently, they began to develop in parallel, from their work with surrealist “objects of symbolic function,” their powerful responses to the atrocities of the civil war and their work inspired by Velázquez,

In 1947 Dalí painted Portrait of Pablo Picasso in the Twenty-First Century (One of a series of portraits of Geniuses: Homer, Dalí, Freud, Christopher Columbus, William Tell, etc.), a slightly horrific portrait which sums up their deeply contradictory relationship. The painting uses heavy symbolism to criticise the “ugliness” that Dalí saw and disliked in Picasso’s later work while putting him on a pedestal and evoking his genius.Portrait-of-Picasso-in-the-Twenty-First-Century-1947-DALI


Nude Standing by the Sea

Nude Standing by the Sea. Pablo Picasso. 1929

Nude Standing by the Sea. Pablo Picasso. 1929

Although never an official member of the Surrealists, despite Breton’s efforts to coopt him, Picasso nevertheless participated in many of their exhibitions and activities in Paris. His work between 1926 and 1939 has been called surrealist because of its fanciful imagery and sexually charged motifs, but despite many shared features, Picasso’s desire to interpret the real world was at odds with Surrealism’s imaginary inner-generated visions.

Here, he was inspired by bathers on a beach that he had previously sketched, painted, and sculpted in Cannes (1927) and Dinard (1928). In these earlier works, as in this 1929 painting, Picasso ultimately transforms the human figure into a strange mutated being, part geometric masonry, part inflated balloon. The features of the female physique metamorphose into one another—the rounded buttocks also suggesting breasts, the pointed breasts suggesting sharp teeth, and the horizontal slit, a reference to both navel and genitals. The overall effect is conflicted, showing both monumentality and vulnerability, sensuality and cold detachment, as if two different sensibilities inhabit this figure. Such imagery may have been a reflection of the artist’s own anguished love life at the time. Married to Olga Khokhlova since 1918, he had been having an affair with a beautiful young teenager, Marie-Thérèse Walter, since the summer of 1927, which would last through the 1930s.

Text from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY


Geometry

Ojeikere

Untitled. J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere. 2004.

direcciones Enio Iommi 1945

Direcciones. Enio Iommi. 1945.

popova_constcomposition (1)

Constructivist Composition. Lyubov Popova. 1921.