Sun Therapy

Olafur Eliasson‘s installation in the Turbine Hall of the Tate Modern:

The Weather Project, Olafur Eliasson, 2003. Photo by Dan Chung

The Weather Project, Olafur Eliasson, 2003. Photo by Dan Chung

The Weather Project, Olafur Eliasson, 2003.

The Weather Project, Olafur Eliasson, 2003.

“In this installation, The Weather Project, representations of the sun and sky dominate the expanse of the Turbine Hall. A fine mist permeates the space, as if creeping in from the environment outside. Throughout the day, the mist accumulates into faint, cloud-like formations, before dissipating across the space. A glance overhead, to see where the mist might escape, reveals that the ceiling of the Turbine Hall has disappeared, replaced by a reflection of the space below. At the far end of the hall is a giant semi-circular form made up of hundreds of mono-frequency lamps. The arc repeated in the mirror overhead produces a sphere of dazzling radiance linking the real space with the reflection. Generally used in street lighting, mono-frequency lamps emit light at such a narrow frequency that colours other than yellow and black are invisible, thus transforming the visual field around the sun into a vast duotone landscape.”
Text from Tate


April

April. Maurice Denis. 1892.

April. Maurice Denis. 1892.


Summer Evening

Summer Evening. Edward Hopper. 1947.

Summer Evening. Edward Hopper. 1947.


Still Lives

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1988.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1988.

Everything in this photograph is utterly artificial, beginning with the painted backdrop. Its mottled forms create an impression of light, which complicates the shaft of genuine light that Groover has introduced from above on the right side of the composition. These effects enliven the somber beauty of the picture and participate in a visual balancing act that also includes the table and all the objects on and around it, which the artist has painted before arranging them. The imprudent red at the lower left adds to the impression of a voluptuous whole.

Since 1978, the still-life genre has been the focus of Groover’s photography, the arena in which she has tested her conviction that “formalism is everything.” That declaration may be understood to mean that the artist’s pictorial decisions-what color meets with what color, how shapes are seen in relationship to each other and to the space they occupy, the scale of forms within the picture-are enough to create a world of meaning. Pursuing this conviction in the closed environment of the studio, Groover has, in fact, created a seemingly infinite variety of visual experience, as rich and surprising as life outside.

(Text from MoMA)

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1983.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1983.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1987.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1987.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1988.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1988.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1987.

Untitled. Jan Groover. 1987.


Portrait in Flowers and Leaves

Untitled Photogram. Varvara Alexandrovna Rodchenko. 1989

Untitled Photogram. Varvara Alexandrovna Rodchenko. 1989


Sun, Sol, Soleil

The sun is shining, summer is here, so here’s an artist with the sunniest of names: Sol LeWitt

A sphere lit from the top, four sides, and all their combinations. Sol Lewitt. 2004.

A sphere lit from the top, four sides, and all their combinations. Sol Lewitt. 2004.

Sol LeWitt’s study of spheres is a study of time and its relationship with art. Each photograph is simultaneously a documentation of the specific state of illumination as well as part of the artist’s abstract narrative. 


The Numinosity of Clouds: Part II

I’ve found another wonderful example of clouds in art to add to the previous collection. This time the “clouds” are trapped in a resin cube:

Small Cloud Box. Peter Alexander. 1966. Polyester resin.

Small Cloud Box. Peter Alexander. 1966. Polyester resin.

The artist, Peter Alexander, was part of the Light and Space movement in the 60s. During this period artists in Southern California started using new materials like plastic, resin, and industrial coating to create sculptures and installations which blurred the lines between art, industry, and science. In his Cloud Box (1966), Peter Alexander made a cube with polyester resin and introduced some water vapour during the casting process.The result was the formation of white “clouds” inside the resin. A beautiful and poetic object which evokes the light and atmospheric conditions of Southern California.