A Curve Like the Curve of a Buttock

More from How to Be Both by Ali Smith, because it’s full of wonderful things:

“I feel the loss, dull the ache of it cause I had it, the place where his legs met his body, the muscular dark where his tunic flared up in the breeze as he went, I had it like telling the oldest story in the world cause there’s a very pure pleasure in a curve like the curve of a buttock : the only other thing as good to draw is the curve of a horse and like a horse a curved line is a warm thing, good-natured, will serve you well if not mistreated.”

Grete Stern – Dream Nº 16, ca. 1950

Dream Nº 16. Grete Stern. ca. 1950

Photograph showing unidentified male nudes on the beach Photographer Unknown null An initial donation of the papers of Tuke and Gotch was made to the Tate Archive by Mr Brian D. Price in 1990. Additional donations of related material were made in 1991, 1994 and 2002. http://www.tate.org.uk/art/archive/TGA-9019-1-4-5-9-1

Photograph showing unidentified male nudes on the beach. Photographer Unknown. Date Unknown.

Ana Regina Nogueira from series Olhos n'agua

Ana Regina Nogueira from series Olhos n’agua

Martin Parr Lifes a Beach

Life’s a Beach. Martin Parr

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Grete Stern

Photomontage by Grete Stern.

Photomontage (Dreams) by Grete Stern.


Sueños/Dreams

From 1948-1951 German-born Argentinian photographer Grete Stern was commissioned to create photo-montages for an Argentinian romance magazine called Idilio. On the basis of descriptions sent in by its female readership she visualised 143 dreams for the series “Psychoanalysis Will Help You“, working in close collaboration with the sociologist and psychoanalyst Gani Germani, who directly advised her on how to depict certain dreams in a Freudian way. Stern had less than a week for each collage, drawing on her archive of landscape photography and using relatives and friends as models. Germani would then refer directly to the collage when analysing the dreams in the magazine.

Stern often presents family as a deathly, alienating force completely inverting its traditional role. Men invariably appear menacing, be it as a direct physical threat in form of a monstrous macho with a tortoise head or as a commodifying force, transforming the female into a usable object, as in ‘Dream 61′ where the woman is the base of a lamp which is about to be switched on by a man. And then there are the obvious, and metaphorically heavy-handed, collages where the female protagonist is trapped in a literal cage, in a corked glass vessel, or beneath a net thrown at her by her husband.

Text from The Argentina Independent

Dreams No. 1. Grete Stern. 1948.

Dream No. 61. Grete Stern. 1948.

Grete Stern  Dream No 5 Bottle cast into the sea 1949

Dream No. 5 (Bottle cast into the sea). Grete Stern. 1949.

Grete Stern – photomontage, 1949

Dreams. Grete Stern. 1949.

Grete Stern – Dream Nº 28, 1951

Dream No. 28. Grete Stern. 1951.