Bored Couples

Bored Couples is Martin Parr‘s humorous study of bored couples around Europe, including Spain, Finland, and the UK, during the 80s and 90s.

“This series of photographs were taken as an opportunity to explore the veracity of the caption.
We do not know if these random couples are bored or not. Who is to say what is authentic when captioned as thus?” Magnum Photos

FINLAND. On board a ferry from Helsinki to Stockholm. From 'Bored Couples'. 1991.

SPAIN. Majorca. Bored Couples. 1993.

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Disavowals

Aveux Non Avenus III. Claude Cahun. 1929-1930

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Head On a Stem

Head on a Stem. Odilon Redon.

Head on a Stem. Odilon Redon.


Eternal Spring

Eternal Spring. Auguste Rodin.

Eternal Spring. Auguste Rodin. 1906-7.


Fallen Angel

Winged Man The Fallen Angel Odilon Redon

Winged Man (The Fallen Angel) Odilon Redon. 1880.


La Perte de Pucelage

La Perte de Pucelage (The Loss of Virginity). Paul Gauguin. 1890-91.

La Perte de Pucelage (The Loss of Virginity). Paul Gauguin. 1890-91.

The Loss of Virginity relates a young girl’s sexual awakening to the natural landscape. Gauguin referred to the fox – a recurrent motif in his work – as the ‘Indian symbol of perversity’, though Breton folklore also identifies it with sexual power. The crowd of figures in the background may be a wedding party coming to meet the deflowered girl. Although painted in Paris at a time when Gauguin was closely involved with Symbolist writers and critics, the landscape is recognisable from other works that he made in Brittany. The model was Juliette Huet, a seamstress. She was two months pregnant at the time, and gave birth to their daughter Germaine while Gauguin was in Tahiti.

Text from Tate


Chromatic Diet: Thursday

The novelist Paul Auster based a character, Maria, on French artist Sophie Calle in his novel Leviathan. After reading the novel, Calle decided to try and become the character, to recreate the parts of Maria that Auster had made up. Maria had a “chromatic diet”, eating food of only one colour on a given day. Monday orange: carrots, cantaloupe, shrimps. Tuesday red: tomatoes, steak tartare. And so on. For a week, Calle followed this regime and photographed it.

“He had used my real life to create a fictional character and I wanted to reverse the process. I asked him to write a character that I could become.”

text from The Independent 

Chromatic Diet, Thursday. Sophie Calle. 1997.

The Chromatic Diet: Thursday. Sophie Calle. 1997.


Woman and Cat

Woman and Cat. Leonard Tsuguharu Foujita. 1937.

Woman and Cat. Leonard Tsuguharu Foujita. 1937.


Anthropométries

Yves Klein used naked women as ‘human paintbrushes’ to make his Anthropometry paintings, which were produced as elaborate performances in front of an audience. Klein, in bow-tie and suit, would conduct the women as they covered themselves in paint (a colour he patented as ‘International Klein Blue’) and made imprints of their bodies, whilst musicians played his ‘Monotone Symphony’ – a single note played for twenty minutes, followed by twenty minutes of silence.

Yves Klein Anthropometry events were one of the key events in the history of painting and performance A revolutionary moment in art when the artist exposed the making of the painting. They really mark a shift between painting as something that happens on the canvas to artists exposing the making of painting

From Tate Shots

Anthropométries. Yves Klein. 1960.

Anthropométries. Yves Klein. 1960.