Build Your Own Body

hanna holch Jean Arp Torso  Guy-Bourdin-English-16

1. Hanna Holch

2. Torso by Jean Arp

3. Guy Bourdin


Mona Lisa

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Mona Lisa, YSL Spring 1999 ad campaign for Rive Gauche.


Lost Things

By Lydia Davis

They are lost, but also not lost but somewhere in the world. Most of them are small, though two are larger, one a coat and one a dog. Of the small things, one is a certain ring, one a certain button. They are lost from me and where I am, but they are also not gone. They are somewhere else, and they are there to someone else, it may be. But if not there to someone else, the ring is, still, not lost to itself, but there, only not where I am, and the button, too, there, still, only not where I am.

A La Recherche Du Shoe Perdu (The Search for the Lost Shoe). Andy Warhol, caption by Ralph Pomeroy. 1955.

A La Recherche Du Shoe Perdu (The Search for the Lost Shoe). Andy Warhol, caption by Ralph Pomeroy. 1955.


Elephants and Dior

Fashion meets circus act in this 1950s Dior shoot by Richard Avedon. Aside from the elegant pose and fantastic elephants, the images have become iconic for their representation of contrasts: youth and age, strength and frailty, grace and awkwardness, freedom and captivity. These images were considered revolutionary when they were first published in 1955, they exceeded the realm of fashion photography and were elevated into fine art.

Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris. Photo by Richard Avedon.

Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris. Photo by Richard Avedon. 1955.

Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris. Photo by Richard Avedon.

This dress was the first designed for Dior by his 19-year-old assistant, Yves Saint-Laurent.


Elsa Schiaparelli: Fashion Meets Surrealism

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Italian fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli (1890-1973) was the first designer to explore irony in fashion. She stands out for her sense of humour and wild imagination, which have made her one of the most influential fashion designers of her time. Schiaparelli’s designs are not only humorous but also thought provoking. She was, above all, an artist. Coco Chanel –her biggest rival– referred to her as ‘that Italian artist who makes clothes’.

Modern art, particularly Surrealism and Dadaism, were a great source of inspiration to her and she did many collaborations with artists of these movements, including Salvador Dalí and Jean Cocteau.

The Tears Dress, one of her collaborations with Dalí, is a beautiful evening gown in pale blue and magenta. The fabric is a trompe l’oeil print of rips and tears, designed to give the illusion of torn animal flesh worn inside out.

This year Christian Lacroix will be unveiling the 15-piece collection which he’s designed for the house of Schiaparelli in honor of her legacy. His designs wil be reinterpretations of her most famous creations, so it should definitely be something to look out for!

Tears Dress designed in collaboration with Salvador Dalí. Part of her 1938 Circus Collection.

Tears Dress designed in collaboration with Salvador Dalí. Part of her 1938 Circus Collection.

The original "Shoe Hat" designed in collaboration with Salvador Dalí, 1937.

The original “Shoe Hat” designed in collaboration with Salvador Dalí, 1937.

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Jacket designed in collaboration with Jean Cocteau for the Autumn collection of 1937

Gloves designed by Elsa Schiaparelli, 1935.

Gloves designed by Elsa Schiaparelli, 1935.

Schiaparelli's surreal giant fly brooch.

Schiaparelli’s surreal giant fly brooch.

elsa schiaparelli cloche

Schiaparelli’s “Eye” hat. 1950.