Inside the Artist’s Studio: Helen Frankenthaler

I love these stunning photographs of Helen Frankenthaler amongst her paintings in her New York City studio. Photographed by Gordon Parks for LIFE magazine ca. 1956:

Helen Frankenthaler sitting amidst her art in her New York City studio. Photographed by Gordon Parks for LIFE magazine ca. 1956 2Helen Frankenthaler sitting amidst her art in her New York City studio. Photographed by Gordon Parks for LIFE magazine ca. 1956for G - 28frankenthaler - UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1956: Painter Helen Frankenthaler sitting amidst her art. (Gordon Parks/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

And here she is at work, photographed by Ernst Haas in her studio in 1969

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Helen Frankenthaler, New York, 1969 by Ernst Haas4

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Geometry

Ojeikere

Untitled. J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere. 2004.

direcciones Enio Iommi 1945

Direcciones. Enio Iommi. 1945.

popova_constcomposition (1)

Constructivist Composition. Lyubov Popova. 1921.


Le Reflet Dans la Fontaine

The Reflection in the Fountain. Maurice Denis. 1897.

The Reflection in the Fountain. Maurice Denis. 1897.


Broadway Boogie Woogie

Broadway Boogie Woogie. Piet Mondrian .1942-3.

Broadway Boogie Woogie. Piet Mondrian .1942-3

Mondrian, who had escaped to New York from Europe after the outbreak of World War II, delighted in the city’s architecture. He was also fascinated by American jazz, particularly boogie-woogie, finding its syncopated beat, irreverent approach to melody, and improvisational aesthetic akin to what he called, in his own work, the “destruction of natural appearance; and construction through continuous opposition of pure means—dynamic rhythm.” In this painting, his penultimate, Mondrian replaced the black grid that had long governed his canvases with predominantly yellow lines that intersect at points marked by squares of blue and red. These atomized bands of stuttering chromatic pulses, interrupted by light gray, create paths across the canvas suggesting the city’s grid, the movement of traffic, and blinking electric lights, as well as the rhythms of jazz.

(Text from MoMA)


Alfredo Hlito

Today I saw this painting by Alfredo Hlito, an Argentinian painter who was one of the pioneers of abstract art in his country. I don’t know what was his inspiration, but perhaps it had something to do with hair? It reminds me of the accidental drawings I see on the walls of my shower.

alfredo hlito

He also does circles, spirals, and shading:

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