Underwater Vision

underwater-vision-1910 Odilon Redon

Underwater Vision. Odilon Redon. 1910.


Ophelia

“There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke;
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide;
And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up:
Which time she chanted snatches of old tunes;
As one incapable of her own distress,
Or like a creature native and indued
Unto that element: but long it could not be
Till that her garments, heavy with their drink,
Pull’d the poor wretch from her melodious lay
To muddy death.”

― William Shakespeare, Hamlet

Ophelia. John Everett Millais. 1851.

Ophelia. John Everett Millais. 1851.

Millais‘ emblematic representation of Shakespeare’s Ophelia recreated through the ages:

Virginia Madsen recreate Ophelia in this scene from the film Fire with Fire, 1986.

Virginia Madsen recreates Ophelia in this scene from the film Fire with Fire, 1986.

The Way Home. Tom Hunter. 1999-2001.

The Way Home. Tom Hunter. 1999-2001.

Untitled (Ophelia). Gregory Crewdson. 2001.

Untitled (Ophelia). Gregory Crewdson. 2001.

Alessandra Sanguineti. Ophelia. 2002.

Alessandra Sanguineti. Ophelia. 2002.

Erin Oconnor Posing as Ophelia. Nadav Kander. 2004.

Erin Oconnor Posing as Ophelia. Nadav Kander. 2004.

Almere - Ophelia. Ellen Kooi. 2006.

Almere – Ophelia. Ellen Kooi. 2006.

“Lay her i’ the earth:
And from her fair and unpolluted flesh
May violets spring!”


Eternal Spring

Eternal Spring. Auguste Rodin.

Eternal Spring. Auguste Rodin. 1906-7.


Passengers

chris-marker-Untitled202 passenger series

chris marker passenger serieschris-marker-Untitled200 passenger series chris-marker-Untitled201 Passenger series

Passengers: A Subway Quartet. Chris Marker. 2008-2010.

In this series of photographs Chris Marker captures the passengers of Paris Metro at their most banal, illuminating the beauty and poetry of our everyday lives. In this sub-series, A Subway Quartet, Marker insets a famous classical painting which mirrors the expression and/or pose of his character.

chrismarker.org


Sunflowers

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Sunflowers. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. 1909.


Landscape at Large

Landscape at Large. Paul Nash. 1936.

Landscape at Large. Paul Nash. 1936.

‘Landscape at Large’ is one of a group of landscape collages made by Paul Nash in 1936-8 in which real objects were used pictorially. The Tate Gallery also has ‘Swanage’ (made from photographs of objects and watercolour) and ‘In the Marshes’ (made from bark and sticks). From the title it is evident that this one was seen by Nash as an abstract landscape, with the shape of the bark suggesting perspective, and the texture and patterns of the materials making the features. The ‘at large’, although not explained by the artist, probably has its usual meaning of either ‘at liberty’ or ‘there in complete detail’, implying that the objects are standing in for themselves.

Text from Tate


A Sudden Gust of Wind

Travellers Caught in a Sudden breeze at Ejiri. Katsushika Hokusai. ca. 1832. Woodprint.

Travellers Caught in a Sudden breeze at Ejiri. Katsushika Hokusai. ca. 1832. Woodcut.

Study for 'A Sudden Gust of Wind (After Hokusai)'. Jeff Wall. 1993.

Study for ‘A Sudden Gust of Wind (After Hokusai)‘. Jeff Wall. 1993.

A Sudden Gust of Wind (after Hokusai).  Jeff Wall. 1993. Transparency on Light Box.

A Sudden Gust of Wind (after Hokusai). Jeff Wall. 1993. Transparency on Light Box.

A Sudden Gust of Wind (after Hokusai) by Jeff Wall is a large colour photograph displayed in a light box. It depicts a flat, open landscape in which four foreground figures are frozen as they respond to a sudden gust of wind. It is based on a woodcut, Travellers Caught in a Sudden breeze at Ejiri(c.1832) from a famous portfolio, The Thirty-six Views of Fuji, by the Japanese painter and printmaker Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). Wall photographed actors in a landscape located outside his home town, Vancouver, at times when similar weather conditions prevailed over a period of five months. He then collaged elements of the photograph digitally in order to achieve the desired composition. The result is a tableau which appears staged in the manner of a classical painting. As in Hokusai’s original, two men clutch their hats to their heads while a third stares up into the sky, where his trilby is being carried away by the wind. On the left, a woman’s body is halted in a state of shock, her head concealed by her scarf which has been blown around her face. A sheaf of papers in her hand has been dispersed by the gust and their trajectory, over the centre of the image, creates a sense of dynamic movement. Two narrow trees, also in the foreground, bend in the force of the wind, releasing dead leaves which mingle with the floating papers. In Hokusai’s image the landscape is a curving path through a reed-filled area next to a lake, leading towards Mount Fuji in the far distance. In Wall’s version, flat brown fields abut onto a canal. Small shacks, a row of telegraph poles and concrete pillars and piping evoke industrial farming. The unromantic nature of the landscape is reinforced by a small structure made of corrugated iron in the foreground. The pathway on which the figures stand is a dirt track extending along the front of the photograph from one side to the other. There is no sense of connection between the characters, whose position in the landscape appears incongruous. Two wear smart city clothes, adding to the sense of displacement.

Text from Tate


La Danse

A Visual History

Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing. William Blake. circa 1786

Oberon, Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing. William Blake. circa 1786.

Dance (I). Henri Matisse. 1909.

La Danse (I). Henri Matisse. 1909.

Dance (II) Matisse. 1909/10

La Danse. Henri Matisse. 1909/10

Music. Henri Matisse. 1910

La Musique. Henri Matisse. 1910

La Danse with Nasturtiums. Matisse. 1912.

La Danse with Nasturtiums. Henri Matisse. 1912.


Absence

By Paul Eluard

I speak to you across cities
I speak to you across plains

My mouth is upon your pillow

Both faces of the walls come meeting
My voice discovering you

I speak to you of eternity

O cities memories of cities
Cities wrapped in our desires
Cities come early cities come lately
Cities strong and cities secret
Plundered of their master’s builders
All their thinkers all their ghosts

Fields pattern of emerald
Bright living surviving
The harvest of the sky over our earth
Feeds my voice I dream and weep
I laugh and dream among the flames
Among the clusters of the sun

And over my body your body spreads
The sheet of it’s bright mirror.

Separation. Edvard Munch. 1896.

Separation. Edvard Munch. 1896.


The Dream

The Dream (The Bed). Frida Kahlo. 1940.

The Dream (The Bed). Frida Kahlo. 1940.

In this painting, as well as others, Frida’s preoccupation with death is revealed. In real life Frida did have a papier-mâché skeleton (Juda) on the canopy of her bed. Diego called it “Frida’s lover” but Frida said it was just an amusing reminder of mortality. Frida and the skeleton both lie on their side with two pillows under their head. While Frida sleeps the skeleton is awake and watching. The bed appears to ascend into the clouds and the embroidered vines on her bedspread seem to come to life and begin to entwine with her body. The roots at the foot of the bed appear to have been pulled out of the ground. The skeleton’s body is entwined with wires and explosives that at any moment could go off… making Frida’s dream of death a stark reality. In this painting and in others, Frida uses the “Life/Death” themethe plants representing the rebirth of life and the skeleton representing death.

Text from FridaKahloFans