Albert’s Way

Francis Alÿs has a knack for turning his walks into art. In Albert’s Way, however, his walk is limited to the four walls of his Mexico City studio. For 10 hours per day during 7 days he circled the periphery of the room, adding up to the 118 km of the Camino Ingles, a pilgrimage route from El Ferrol to Santiago de Compostela. His inspiration came from Albert Speer, Hitler’s architect, known for being the only Nazi leader at the Nuremberg war-crimes trials in 1945-46 to admit his guilt: Rumour goes that while jailed in Spandau, Albert Speer walked in circles in the prison patio, pacing the exact distance from one city to another and imagining the places he’d be passing through on his virtual tour around the globe.


Should we have stayed at home and thought of here?

Questions of Travel, a poem by Elizabeth Bishop, was written in Rio and published in 1956 about five years after she first moved there.

There are too many waterfalls here; the crowded streams
hurry too rapidly down to the sea,
and the pressure of so many clouds on the mountaintops
makes them spill over the sides in soft slow-motion,
turning to waterfalls under our very eyes.
–For if those streaks, those mile-long, shiny, tearstains,
aren’t waterfalls yet,
in a quick age or so, as ages go here,
they probably will be.
But if the streams and clouds keep travelling, travelling,
the mountains look like the hulls of capsized ships,
slime-hung and barnacled.

Think of the long trip home.
Should we have stayed at home and thought of here?
Where should we be today?
Is it right to be watching strangers in a play
in this strangest of theatres?
What childishness is it that while there’s a breath of life
in our bodies, we are determined to rush
to see the sun the other way around?
The tiniest green hummingbird in the world?
To stare at some inexplicable old stonework,
inexplicable and impenetrable,
at any view,
instantly seen and always, always delightful?
Oh, must we dream our dreams
and have them, too?
And have we room
for one more folded sunset, still quite warm?

But surely it would have been a pity
not to have seen the trees along this road,
really exaggerated in their beauty,
not to have seen them gesturing
like noble pantomimists, robed in pink.
–Not to have had to stop for gas and heard
the sad, two-noted, wooden tune
of disparate wooden clogs
carelessly clacking over
a grease-stained filling-station floor.
(In another country the clogs would all be tested.
Each pair there would have identical pitch.)
–A pity not to have heard
the other, less primitive music of the fat brown bird
who sings above the broken gasoline pump
in a bamboo church of Jesuit baroque:
three towers, five silver crosses.
–Yes, a pity not to have pondered,
blurr’dly and inconclusively,
on what connection can exist for centuries
between the crudest wooden footwear
and, careful and finicky,
the whittled fantasies of wooden footwear
and, careful and finicky,
the whittled fantasies of wooden cages.
–Never to have studied history in
the weak calligraphy of songbirds’ cages.
–And never to have had to listen to rain
so much like politicians’ speeches:
two hours of unrelenting oratory
and then a sudden golden silence
in which the traveller takes a notebook, writes:

“Is it lack of imagination that makes us come
to imagined places, not just stay at home?
Or could Pascal have been not entirely right
about just sitting quietly in one’s room?

Continent, city, country, society:
the choice is never wide and never free.
And here, or there . . . No. Should we have stayed at home,
wherever that may be?”


Life’s a Beach

Martin Parr has been photographing beach life over many decades, documenting all aspects of this tradition including close ups of sun bathers, swimming dips and picnics in the UK as well as in countries as far apart as China, Argentina and Thailand. This [collection] demonstrates Parr’s engagement with a cherished subject matter, where all absurdities and quirky National behaviours seamlessly fuse together. Text from Magnum Photos
MartinParrLifesABeachmartin-parr-couple-showering-copacabana-beach-2007Martin Parr RioMartin Parr Lifes a BeachITALY. Riva del Garda. 1999. Contact email: New York : photography@magnumphotos.com Paris : magnum@magnumphotos.fr London : magnum@magnumphotos.co.uk Tokyo : tokyo@magnumphotos.co.jp Contact phones: New York : +1 212 929 6000 Paris: + 33 1 53 42 50 00 London: + 44 20 7490 1771 Tokyo: + 81 3 3219 0771 Image URL: http://www.magnumphotos.com/Archive/C.aspx?VP3=ViewBox_VPage&IID=2S5RYD12ILER&CT=Image&IT=ZoomImage01_VForm

ITALY. Lake Garda. 1999.

JAPAN. Miyazaki. Miyazaki Ocean Dome. 1996.


Waters of March

Named as the best Brazilian song of all time, Aguas de Março (Waters of March) was composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim in 1972. The beautiful lyrics are a stream of consciousness about March, the peak of the rainy season in Rio.

It is a footstep, it is a bridge
It is a frog, it is a frog
It is a rest of bush…
under the morning light

They are the waters of March,
Closing the summer
And the promise of life
in your heart …


Rio

Rio de Janeiro. Gil Prates.

Rio de Janeiro. Gil Prates.

 


The Great Escape

Photographs by William Eggleston

William Eggleston_12Girl w/red hair, 7/26/01, 9:57 AM, 8C, 5163x7235 (574+465), 100%, copy-dye, 1/30 s, R62.0, G55.0, B88.0

William Eggleston, Untitled, (Glass in Airplane), from the Los Alamos Portfolio, 1965 - 74

 


Ode to Bread

Extract from Ode to Bread By Pablo Neruda

Bread,
you rise
from flour,
water
and fire.
Dense or light,
flattened or round,
you duplicate
the mother’s
rounded womb,
and earth’s
twice-yearly
swelling.
How simple
you are, bread,
and how profound!

Click to read whole poem